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RESEARCH RESOURCES AND RESEARCH TUTORIALS FROM UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

Page history last edited by LLA 2 weeks ago

 

WRITING SOURCES -- INCLUDING ONLINE (FREE) TEXTBOOKS ON HOW TO WRITE -- MAY BE FOUND HERE

 

 

NEW!

HOW TO RESEARCH IN ORDER TO SUPPORT AN ARGUMENT

 

 

Interactive Tutorials:

Introduction to Online Learning Download
Getting Tech Ready Download
Organizing for Online Success Download
Online Study Skills and Managing Time Download
Communication Skills for Online Learning Download
Online Reading Strategies Download
Career Planning Download
Educational Planning Download
Instructional Support Download
Personal Support Download
Financial Planning Download

Interactive Tools:

 

 

NEW!

PREPARING FOR UNIVERSITY: A FREE ONLINE COURSE

("This course explores and develops key analytical skills that students need in order to succeed at university learning environment.")

 

 

NEW!

Introduction to College Research

("This book acknowledges the changing information landscape, covering key concepts in information literacy to support a research process with intention. It starts by critically examining the online environment, looking at algorithms, the attention economy, information disorder and cynicism, information hygiene, and fact-checking. It then explores information source types, meaningful research topics, keyword choices, effective search strategies, library resources, Web search considerations, the ethical use of information, and citation.")

 

 

NEW!

ACADEMIC SUCCESS

Table of Contents:

  • I. Part A: Successful Beginnings
    • Beginnings
    • Adjusting to University
    • Successful Connections
  • II. Part B: Successful Foundations
    • English Language Foundations
    • Working with Information
  • III. Part C: Successful Study Skills
    • Goals and Priorities
    • Combatting Procrastination
    • Time Management
    • Study Space
    • Reading
    • Notetaking
    • Thinking
  • IV. Part D: Successful Assessment
    • Managing Assessment
    • Writing Assignments
    • Types of Assignments
    • Presentations
    • Preparing for Exams
    • Types of Exams

About this Book:

Academic Success is designed to help students on their university journey.

It is divided into four parts, each reflecting different aspects of a student’s tertiary experience.

Part A: Successful Beginnings addresses what it is like to be a new student at an Australian university.

Part B: Successful Foundations introduces basic skills in English language, techniques for accessing and working with information, and understanding academic integrity.

Part C: Successful Study Skills presents the everyday, core skills that successful students use while at university.

Lastly, Part D: Successful Assessment meets head-on the challenges of tertiary assessments.

This open book ultimately aids students across all disciplines in achieving academic success at university.

 

NEW!

Blueprint for Success in College and Career

Dave Dillon, Grossmont College, El Cajon, CA

("Blueprint for Success in College and Career is a remix of four previously existing OER (Open Educational Resources): A Different Road To College: A Guide For Transitioning To College For Non-traditional Students by Alise Lamoreaux, How to Learn Like a Pro! by Phyllis Nissila, Foundations of Academic Success: Words of Wisdom, edited by Thomas Priester, College Success, provided by Lumen Learning, and one previously copyrighted textbook with content that is now openly licensed: Blueprint for Success in College: Indispensable Study Skills and Time Management Strategies by Dave Dillon. A free OER, (Open Educational Resource), Blueprint for Success in College and Career is a students' guide for classroom and career success. This text, designed to show how to be successful in college and in career preparation focuses on study skills, time management, career exploration, health, and financial literacy.")

 

 

 

NEW!

The Dartmouth E-Guide to Academic Success ACADEMIC SUCCESS: HOW TO ACHIEVE IT (PRACTICAL SKILLS TRAINING)
sites.dartmouth.edu/learning/free-study-skills-e-book

"Students and educators may find The Dartmouth E-Guide to Academic Success to be a helpful resource. This e-guide is a free downloadable book published by Dartmouth College's Academic Skills Center in 2017. In 8 chapters and fewer than 100 pages (double-spaced), it offers readers a thorough, concise narrative reference for how to survive and thrive in college. It begins by introducing readers to the idea of a growth mindset and explaining how to set effective goals for college, then walks readers through strategies for time management. The e-guide also includes a variety of methods for important study skills, such as taking useful notes, reading efficiently, and writing college essays. Students (current and former) may also find the e-guide's tips on overcoming procrastination and enhancing productivity to be helpful. Links to cited references (both peer-reviewed and popular) and additional information are included throughout the book, and it makes good use of explanatory graphics as well. This e-guide was written by Carl Thum, Director of the Academic Skills Program, and Jonathan Lu, an undergraduate student at Dartmouth College." FROM THE INTERNET SCOUT REPORT, ISR, AUGUST 9, 2019)

 

 

NEW!

INTRODUCTION TO ACADEMIC RESEARCH

Click on VIEW MATERIAL to the left of your screen

("This is the textbook (reader) for the course Introduction to Academic Research, taught at the Faculty of Spatial Sciences, University of Groningen. This is a compilation of four chapters from 3 different textbooks that are classified as open educational resources (OER) and together provide the accompanying literature for the course.

The chapters cover the following topics:

- Academic research and the research process

- Research ethics

The original sources of the chapters in this textbook are mentioned on every page. These texts are taken almost verbatim from the mentioned sources; small adjustments have been made for the consistency of referencing, providing a little context, or aligning the numbering of sections.")

 

 

 

 

NEW!

College Libraries Ontario’s [Canada]Learning Portal (https://tlp-lpa.ca/research/how-to-research) has a comprehensive guide on how to do research, along with tips on how to evaluate the quality of your sources.

 

 

 

NEW!

FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY'S SLS 1510: STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS: AN ONLINE (FREE) TEXTBOOK

SLS 1510 | Strategies for Success:

"This online textbook is designed to provide students with useful strategies and guidance for their transition from high school to college. We know that each student is on a unique path and we hope the lessons in his text will help them toward achieving their goals both in and out of the classroom.  This textbook was designed for use by high schools offering dual enrollment sections of the Florida International University course SLS 1510, Strategies for Success. This textbook is made available free for students, instructors, and parents. If your institution would like to adapt this text for use in a similar course, please contact success@FIU.edu"

Chapter 1: Introduction & the Transition from High School to College

Chapter 8: Critical Thinking, Problem-solving, & Creative Thinking (included in this chapter is a nice section on Information Literacy)

 

 

 

NEW!

Crash Course: Study Skills STUDY SKILLS -- YOUTUBE VIDEOS
www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8dPuuaLjXtNcAJRf3bE1IJU6nMfHj86W

"Students and learners of all stripes will likely find the video series Crash Course: Study Skills to be a helpful resource for learning how to study effectively and increase productivity. Part of Hank and John Green's popular Crash Course YouTube channel, this series was released in the fall of 2017 and is hosted by Thomas Frank, founder of CollegeInfoGeek.com.

Here, readers will find 10 engaging episodes covering topics like how to take notes and read lengthy assignments efficiently, ways to get organized and stay focused, and ideas for beating procrastination and avoiding test anxiety. As Frank points out, these are "skills that will serve you both in your life as a student and wherever you choose to go afterwards," so even those who have left their student years behind may learn some useful tips from this series. Each fast-paced episode is approximately ten minutes long, so even the busiest learner can squeeze one into their schedule." (FROM THE INTERNET SCOUT REPORT, AUGUST 9, 2019)

 

 

 

NEW!

University 101: Study, Strategize and Succeed

"University 101: Study Strategize Succeed helps you to create a foundation for post-secondary studies by learning how to learn.  By taking the time to read this book and work through the exercises included, you are investing in the skills that will support you in all of your classes and future learning.  Successful students share a set of skills and habits in common.  The good news is that these skills are not a secret; anyone can learn the skills that support successful learning. By taking some time to learn proven study strategies, you will be able to reach your learning goals, and avoid the pitfalls that can take you off-track."

Table of Contents:

    1. University 101: Study, Strategize and Succeed

    2. Acknowledgements

    3. Acknowledgements: eCampusOntario

    4. I. Learning in University: The Critical Skill of Metacognition

    5. 1. Develop a Foundation for Post-secondary Education

    6. 2. Explore the Planning-Monitoring-Evaluation Cycle

    7. 3. Learn How to Use This Book

 

  1. II. Plan for Success: Knowing Yourself and Setting Goals

    1. 4. Evaluate Your Learning Skills and Strengths

    2. 5. Evaluate Your Current Learning Strategies

    3. 6. Set Goals to Move Ahead

 

  1. III. Your First Week: Getting Organized and Finding Resources

    1. 7. Analyze Your Course Presentation

    2. 8. Connect With Your Instructor

    3. 9. Get to Know University Resources

 

  1. IV. Manage Your Time: Study Strategies for Busy Students

    1. 10. See Your Semester at a Glance

    2. 11. Create a Weekly Schedule that Works

    3. 12. Organize Your Day for Maximum Productivity

    4. 13. Escape the Procrastination Trap

  2. V. Learn From Lectures and Texts

    1. 14. Set Your Purpose for Reading Textbooks

    2. 15. Read with a Purpose:  The SQ3R Strategy

    3. 16. Take Notes from Lectures – That You’ll Actually Use

 

  1. VI. Study Smart – Use Powerful Strategies to Remember, Understand and Apply

    1. 17. Choose Strategies for Active Learning

    2. 18. Master Your Memory

    3. 19. Use Effective Questioning Strategies

    4. 20. Explore the Four Levels of Questioning

 

 

  1. VII. Get Those Projects Done

    1. 21. Analyze Your Assignment

    2. 22. Develop an Assignment Plan

    3. 23. Move Beyond Writer’s Block

    4. 24. Create an Outline

    5. 25. Write the First Draft

    6. 26. Self-Edit Your Work

 

 

  1. VIII. Get Ready for Exams

    1. 27. Organize Review Sessions Strategically

    2. 28. Answer Your Exam Questions

    3. 29. Manage Exam Stress

 

 

  1. IX. Evaluate and Move Ahead

    1. 30. Evaluate Your Learning

    2. 31. Develop a Growth Mindset

    3. 32. Put the Growth Mindset into Practice

 

  1. Worksheet Downloads:

  Worksheet Downloads include:

The Try It! sections of this book include downloadable worksheets for students to actively process the concepts they are learning.  This page compiles the available worksheets for easy reference.

Chapter 2:  Explore the Planning-Monitoring-Evaluation Cycle

Chapter 4: Evaluate Your Learning Skills and Strengths

Chapter 5: Evaluate Your Current Learning Strategies

Chapter 6: Set Goals to Move Ahead

Chapter 7: Analyse Your Course Presentation

Chapter 8: Connect With Your Instructor

Chapter 10: See Your Semester at a Glance

Chapter 11: Create a Weekly Schedule that Works

Chapter 15: Read with a Purpose: The SQ3R Strategy

Chapter 16: Take Notes from Lectures – That You’ll Actually Use

Chapter 19: Use Effective Questioning Strategies

Chapter 22: Develop an Assignment Plan

Chapter 27: Organize Review Sessions Strategically

Chapter 30: Evaluate Your Learning

Chapter 31: Develop a Growth Mindset

 

  

NEW!

University Success -- 2nd Edition 

CONTENTS:

Preface

I. Chapter 1: You and Your University Experience 

1. 1.1 Who Are You, Really?

2. 1.2 Different Worlds of Different Students

3. 1.3 How You Learn

4. 1.4 What Is University, Really?

5. 1.5 Let’s Talk about Success

6. 1.6 Chapter Activities

II. Chapter 2: Staying Motivated, Organized, and On Track 

7. 2.1 Setting and Reaching Goals

8. 2.2 Organizing Your Space

9. 2.3 Organizing Your Time

10. 2.4 Chapter Activities

III. Chapter 3: Listening, Taking Notes, and Remembering 

11. 3.1 Setting Yourself Up for Success

12. 3.2 Are You Ready for Class?

13. 3.3 Are You Really Listening?

14. 3.4 Got Notes?

15. 3.5 Remembering Course Materials

16. 3.6 Chapter Activities

IV. Chapter 4: Thinking about Thought 

17. 4.1 Types of Thinking

18. 4.2 It’s Critical

19. 4.3 Searching for “Aha!”

20. 4.4 Problem Solving and Decision Making

21. 4.5 Chapter Activities

V. Chapter 5: Reading to Learn 

22. 5.1 Are You Ready for the Big Leagues?

23. 5.2 How Do You Read to Learn?

24. 5.3 Dealing with Special Texts

25. 5.4 Building Your Vocabulary

26. 5.5 Chapter Activities

VI. Chapter 6: Preparing for and Taking Tests 

27. 6.1 Test Anxiety and How to Control It

28. 6.2 Studying to Learn (Not Just for Tests)

29. 6.3 Taking Tests

30. 6.4 The Secrets of the Q and A’s

31. 6.5 The Honest Truth

32. 6.6 Using Test Results

33. 6.7 Chapter Activities

VII. Chapter 7: Interacting with Instructors and Classes 

34. 7.1 Why Attend Classes at All?

35. 7.2 Participating in Class

36. 7.3 Communicating with Instructors

37. 7.4 Public Speaking and Class Presentations

38. 7.5 Chapter Activities

VIII. Chapter 8: Writing in University: It’s All About the Process! 

39. 8.1 Steps in the Research and Writing Process

40. 8.2 Stage One: Prewriting Activities

41. 8.3 Stage Two: Drafting Activities

42. 8.4: Stage Three: Editing and Proofreading

IX. Chapter 9: The Social World of University 

43. 9.1 Getting Along with Others

44. 9.2 Living with Diversity

45. 9.3 Campus Groups

46. 9.4 Chapter Activities

X. Chapter 10: Taking Control of Your Health 

47. 10.1 Nutrition and Weight Control

48. 10.2 Activity and Exercise

49. 10.3 Sleep

50. 10.4 Substance Use and Abuse

51. 10.5 Stress

52. 10.6 Emotional Health and Happiness

53. 10.7 Chapter Activities

XI. Chapter 11: Taking Control of Your Finances 

54. 11.1 Financial Goals and Realities

55. 11.2 Making Money

56. 11.3 Spending Less

57. 11.4 Credit Cards

58. 11.5 Financing University and Looking Ahead

59. 11.6 Chapter Activities

XII. Chapter 12: Taking Control of Your Future 

60. 12.1 The Dream of a Lifetime

61. 12.2 Career Exploration

62. 12.3 Choosing Your Major

63. 12.4 Getting the Right Stuff

64. 12.5 Career Development Starts Now

65. 12.6 The Power of Networking

66. 12.7 Résumés and Cover Letters

67. 12.8 Interviewing for Success

68. 12.9 Chapter Activities

 

 

NEW!

STUDENT SUCCESS: ONLINE READINESS ASSESSMENT (from Ohio State University)

("This assessment asks you a series of questions to determine your strengths in several key areas important to being an online student. 

The areas assessed include study habits, learning styles, technical knowledge, and time management skills.  After answering the survey questions and clicking on the “Am I Ready?” button, you will be presented with your assessment and ways to improve in any areas deemed necessary.")

 

ALSO, SEE THE RELATED: Student Online Readiness Self-Assessment

https://csufullyonline.com/CSU_assessment.aspx

 

from the California Community Colleges Online Education Initiative:

ONLINE STUDENT READINESS TUTORIALS

 

 

 

NEW!

SOME IDEAS ON WRITING COLLEGE APPLICATION ESSAYS (from AFSA)

 

 

 

NEW!

Student Success for Community College students

This guide will help students at Community Collegees successfully complete a college degree and also help them become lifelong learners. 

KEYWORDS: remote campus learning, student success, lifelong learning, graduation success, college students, community colleges

 

 

 

NEW!

PLANNING FOR SUCCESS: YOUR JOURNEY TO THE UNIVERSITY AND BEYOND

(Provides very solid academic advice --as well as excellent personal and financial advice)

 

 

 

NEW!

Your Journey to First-Year Success: A K-State First Companion Textbook

Description:

This textbook companion is a resource to help students successfully navigate through their first year at Kansas State University. It serves as part of the K-State First mission to create an outstanding university experience for every first-year student by helping with the transition to college-level learning and college life. The textbook helps improve chances for student success by focusing on fostering campus community, offering resources for diverse activities, highlighting academic expectations, and empowering students with personal responsibility and social agency. Instructors are encouraged to use the textbook in their K-State First classes, and it is also offered as a direct resource for students. In any university setting there are often unwritten rules that students are expected to understand, and this guide addresses and answers those questions directly. Ultimately, this guide encourages students to be engaged learners and to enjoy all facets of education, both inside and outside the classroom.

Download EPUB e-book (797 KB)

Download Kindle e-book (1.9 MB)

Download Introducing the University community (1.8 MB)

Download Finding your purpose (1.9 MB)

Download Practicing student success skills (1.7 MB)

Download Additional resources and Glossary (910 KB)

Textbooks from Kansas State University may be found here

 

 

NEW!

NO LIMITS: THE TRANSITION TO COLLEGE from UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT ARLINGTON (UTA)

"Student Success and First Year Experience are learning community courses at UTA that teach new students academic success skills to aid their transition to college. The goal of the courses is to help students identify their individual needs, determine what resources are appropriate, recognize the faculty role in their development, and formulate a plan for an actively engaged and enriched experience from campus to career. The courses will be taught by Peer Academic Leaders (PALs) and faculty, staff and/or graduate students to provide guidance, raise awareness and understanding of students' majors and help support collaborative and co-curricular opportunities available within the School/College. This open educational resource is the required textbook for both courses."

Table of Contents:

  • Chapter 1: Welcome to UT Arlington
  • Chapter 2: About a University
  • Chapter 3: Campus Life - The value Added from Involvement
  • Chapter 4: Foundations of Academic Self-Management
  • Chapter 5: Self-Directed and Active Learning
  • Chapter 6: Avoiding the Hazards Along the Way
  • Chapter 7: Healthy Living
  • Chapter 8: Self- and Career Exploration
  • Chapter 9: Financial Self-Management
  • Chapter 10: Campus Resources

 

 

NEW!

STUDENT SUCCESS MANUAL FOR FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS: Georgia Tech First-Year Seminar

Authors' Description:

"This ebook has been created and designed to introduce incoming Georgia Tech students to campus resources, Georgia Tech culture and traditions, and to provide you with guidance as you make the transition to Georgia Tech."

 

 

NEW!

STRATEGIES FOR TAKING A TIMED EXAM (UCLA LIBRARIES)

("Timed exams often test your ability to think and write quickly, manage your time, dissect a question, and more. This tutorial will offer tips to help you strategize for your next timed exam!")

 

 

NEW!

COLLEGE SUCCESS: from the University of Minnesota Libraries

Chapter 1: You and Your College Experience

  1. 1.1 Who Are You, Really?

  2. 1.2 Different Worlds of Different Students

  3. 1.3 How You Learn

  4. 1.4 What Is College, Really?

  5. 1.5 Let’s Talk about Success

  6. 1.6 Chapter Activities

  1. 2.1 Setting and Reaching Goals

  2. 2.2 Organizing Your Space

  3. 2.3 Organizing Your Time

  4. 2.4 Chapter Activities

  1. 3.1 Types of Thinking

  2. 3.2 It’s Critical

  3. 3.3 Searching for “Aha!”

  4. 3.4 Problem Solving and Decision Making

  5. 3.5 Chapter Activities

  1. 4.1 Setting Yourself Up for Success

  2. 4.2 Are You Ready for Class?

  3. 4.3 Are You Really Listening?

  4. 4.4 Got Notes?

  5. 4.5 Remembering Course Materials

  6. 4.6 Chapter Activities

  1. 5.1 Are You Ready for the Big Leagues?

  2. 5.2 How Do You Read to Learn?

  3. 5.3 Dealing with Special Texts

  4. 5.4 Building Your Vocabulary

  5. 5.5 Chapter Activities

  1. 6.1 Test Anxiety and How to Control It

  2. 6.2 Studying to Learn (Not Just for Tests)

  3. 6.3 Taking Tests

  4. 6.4 The Secrets of the Q and A’s

  5. 6.5 The Honest Truth

  6. 6.6 Using Test Results

  7. 6.7 Chapter Activities

  1. 7.1 Why Attend Classes at All?

  2. 7.2 Participating in Class

  3. 7.3 Communicating with Instructors

  4. 7.4 Public Speaking and Class Presentations

  5. 7.5 Chapter Activities

  1. 8.1 What’s Different about College Writing?

  2. 8.2 How Can I Become a Better Writer?

  3. 8.3 Other Kinds of Writing in College Classes

  4. 8.4 Chapter Activities

  1. 9.1 Getting Along with Others

  2. 9.2 Living with Diversity

  3. 9.3 Campus Groups

  4. 9.4 Chapter Activities

  1. 10.1 Nutrition and Weight Control

  2. 10.2 Activity and Exercise

  3. 10.3 Sleep

  4. 10.4 Substance Use and Abuse

  5. 10.5 Stress

  6. 10.6 Emotional Health and Happiness

  7. 10.7 Sexual Health

  8. 10.8 Chapter Activities

  1. 11.1 Financial Goals and Realities

  2. 11.2 Making Money

  3. 11.3 Spending Less

  4. 11.4 Credit Cards

  5. 11.5 Financing College and Looking Ahead

  6. 11.6 Chapter Activities

 

 

NEW!

Research for College Students v1.0

"Overview: Presents the research process for lower-level undergraduate students: developing topics, understanding sources, developing search strategies, academic integrity, and MLA and APA documentation styles."

from the Lake Sumter College Libraries

https://libguides.lssc.edu/researchforcollegestudents

 

The entire book can be freely downloaded via this URL:

https://libguides.lssc.edu/ld.php?content_id=49485198

 

 

 

NEW!

RESEARCH 101: AN INTRODUCTION

from CSN LIBRARIES: THE COLLEGE OF SOUTHERN NEVADA

Includes How to Evaluate your sources, how to cite your sources, identifying keywords, how to find books and articles, and much more!

The Library Brochure for CSN Libraries may be found here

 

 

 

NEW!

CRAFTING A RESEARCH QUESTION (A UCLA LIBRARIES GUIDE)

Coming up with a good research question is essential for any research! Whether you're joining a faculty-led group or initiating an independent research project, research questions will be central to your work.

By the end of this activity, you'll be able to:

  • Generate potential research questions

  • Refine and improve your research questions

  • Explain the broader significance of your research question

Not affiliated with UCLA?

No problem! All of our workshops and activities are open access and freely available to all! Enjoy the activities!

 

 

NEW!

and also from the UCLA LIBRARIES: BEGINNING YOUR RESEARCH JOURNEY

Beginning Your Research Journey

Anyone can get started with research—all it takes is curiosity and persistence!

By the end of this activity, you'll be able to:

  • Describe the nature of research

  • List reasons to do research

  • Articulate your goals for doing research

Keywords:   research question, brainstorm, research interests, Research, research goals

 

 

 

NEW!

OEI Online Readiness Tutorials: A California Community Colleges Initiative

("The Online Education Initiative (OEI) has developed the Online Student Readiness Tutorials, a series of interactive multimedia tutorials that address the real challenges experienced by online students, new and experienced, while pursuing success in online classes. Therefore the goal of these tutorials is to assist California community college students with developing the skills required to be successful in an online course.

Through a variety of engaging activities and resources, these tutorials will help prepare students for greater success in the online learning environment. All of the tutorials are intended to improve the rates of success and retention in online courses. Tutorials 1-6 focus on skill development for new online students, while the remaining tutorials identify resources and strategies to assist the experience online student with timely course and degree completion. Along with the tutorials we have provided a set of interactive tools that are useful to students as they continue their academic pursuits.")

Interactive Tutorials:

Introduction to Online Learning Download
Getting Tech Ready Download
Organizing for Online Success Download
Online Study Skills and Managing Time Download
Communication Skills for Online Learning Download
Online Reading Strategies Download
Career Planning Download
Educational Planning Download
Instructional Support Download
Personal Support Download
Financial Planning Download

Interactive Tools:

 

 

 

NEW!

FREE ONLINE COURSES IN CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS AND ONLINE WRITING FOR THE COLLEGE-BOUND

 

 

 

 

NEW!

PREPARING FOR UNIVERSITY: A FREE ONLINE COURSE

("This course explores and develops key analytical skills that students need in order to succeed at university learning environment.")

 

 

 

NEW! FROM JSTOR

Research Basics: an open academic research skills course (includes credibility -- how to assess if a website is credible)

 

The Establishing Credibility Module is available here

 

 


THE PROCESS OF RESEARCH WRITING: A FREE TEXTBOOK FROM EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

Table of Contents:

 

 

 

NEW!

INFORMED ARGUMENTS: A GUIDE TO WRITING AND RESEARCH

(from TEXAS A&M)

 

 

 

NEW!

College Skills Navigated Learning Tutorial

 

 

 

NEW!

Crash Course: Study Skills

STUDY SKILLS -- YOUTUBE VIDEOS
www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8dPuuaLjXtNcAJRf3bE1IJU6nMfHj86W

"Students and learners of all stripes will likely find the video series Crash Course: Study Skills to be a helpful resource for learning how to study effectively and increase productivity. Part of Hank and John Green's popular Crash Course YouTube channel, this series was released in the fall of 2017 and is hosted by Thomas Frank, founder of CollegeInfoGeek.com.

Here, readers will find 10 engaging episodes covering topics like how to take notes and read lengthy assignments efficiently, ways to get organized and stay focused, and ideas for beating procrastination and avoiding test anxiety. As Frank points out, these are "skills that will serve you both in your life as a student and wherever you choose to go afterwards," so even those who have left their student years behind may learn some useful tips from this series. Each fast-paced episode is approximately ten minutes long, so even the busiest learner can squeeze one into their schedule." (FROM THE INTERNET SCOUT REPORT, AUGUST 9, 2019)

 

 

 

 

NEW!

COLLEGE SUCCESS 101 for 2019 to 2020

An example of how a University welcomes students and gives new students key advice and guidance to insure educational success

INCLUDES: WHAT EVERY STUDENT NEEDS TO KNOW (GUIDES FOR CITING SOURCES, PLAGIARISM, etc.)

"Much of your college education will involve reading and learning about what others have written and integrating those ideas into your own thinking and writing. Learning from others and integrating their ideas into your own work is what scholarship is all about.

This set of modules is all about learning how to be a good scholar and use the creative work of others ethically.

  1. What you don't know can hurt you mouse icon Click
  2. What needs to be acknowledged? mouse icon Click
  3. Style manuals: guides for citing sources mouse icon Click
  4. Ready for some practice? mouse icon Click
  5. Plagiarism quiz mouse icon Click"

 

 

 

 

PLAGIARISM VIDEO

 

 

 

 

NEW!

WEB LITERACY FOR STUDENT FACT CHECKERS

https://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/textbooks/web-literacy-for-student-fact-checkers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NEW!

Foundations of Academic Success: Words of Wisdom

Thomas C. Priester, SUNY Genesee Community College, Batavia

("Foundations of Academic Success: Words of Wisdom (FAS: WoW) introduces you to the various aspects of student and academic life on campus and prepares you to thrive as a successful college student (since there is a difference between a college student and a successful college student).

Each section of FAS: WoW is framed by self-authored, true-to-life short stories from actual State University of New York (SUNY) students, employees, and alumni.

The advice they share includes a variety of techniques to help you cope with the demands of college.

The lessons learned are meant to enlarge your awareness of self with respect to your academic and personal goals and assist you to gain the necessary skills to succeed in college.")

 

 

 

Other Books and Textbooks on achieving Student Success may be found here: Student Success

 

 

 

NAVIGATING THE LIBRARY AS AN INTERNATIONAL STUDENT:

http://infoguides.gmu.edu/intlstudents

added July 14, 2018 (from GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY, USA)

Includes the following:

Welcome to the Navigating the Library as an International Student InfoGuide. 

Use this guide to discover resources available to you at Mason.

 

 

 

NEW!

Information Empowerment: Information Seeking and Data Resources in the Research Context (UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN)

 

 

 

 

NEW!

Choosing & Using Sources: A Guide to Academic Research

Cheryl Lowry, Ohio State University

Choosing & Using Sources presents a process for academic research and writing, from formulating your research question to selecting good information and using it effectively in your research assignments. Additional chapters cover understanding types of sources,

searching for information, and avoiding plagiarism. Each chapter includes self-quizzes and activities to reinforce core concepts and help you apply them. There are also appendices for quick reference on search tools, copyright basics, and fair use.

 

 

 

 

NEW!

The Process of Research Writing

Steven D. Krause, Eastern Michigan University

("The title of this book is The Process of Research Writing, and in the nutshell, that is what the book is about. A lot of times, instructors and students tend to separate “thinking,” “researching,” and “writing” into different categories that aren't necessarily very well connected.

First you think, then you research, and then you write.)

 

 

NEW!

FRAMING A RESEARCH QUESTION

 

 

 

NEW!

The Information Literacy User's Guide: An Open, Online Textbook

Deborah Bernnard, University of Albany;  Greg Bobish, University of Albany;  Daryl Bullis, Babson College;  Jenna Hecker, University of Albany;  Irina Holden, University of Albany;  Allison Hosier, University of Albany;  Trudi Jacobson, University of Albany; Tor Loney, Albany Public Library

("Good researchers have a host of tools at their disposal that make navigating today's complex information ecosystem much more manageable.

Gaining the knowledge, abilities, and self-reflection necessary to be a good researcher helps not only in academic settings, but is invaluable in any career, and throughout one's life.

The Information Literacy User's Guide will start you on this route to success.")

 

 

 

 

NEW!

Information Literacy: Research and Collaboration across Disciplines

Barbara J. D'Angelo, Arizona State University

Sandra Jamieson, Drew University

Barry Maid, Arizona State University

("This collection brings together scholarship and pedagogy from multiple perspectives and disciplines, offering nuanced and complex perspectives on Information Literacy in the second decade of the 21st century.

Taking as a starting point the concerns that prompted the Association of Research Libraries (ACRL) to review the Information Literacy Standards for Higher Education and develop the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education (2015),

the chapters in this collection consider six frameworks that place students in the role of both consumer and producer of information within today's collaborative information environments.

Contributors respond directly or indirectly to the work of the ACRL,providing a bridge between past/current knowledge and the future and advancing the notion that faculty, librarians, administrators, and external stakeholders share responsibility

and accountability for the teaching, learning, and research of Information Literacy.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NEW!

SYLLABI OF INFORMATION LITERACY COURSES OFFERED THROUGH UNIVERSITIES IN THE U.S. (A GOOGLE DRIVE DOCUMENT)

 

 

 

 

 

NEW!

A Cheatsheet for Critical Thinking

 

 

 

 

 

 

PLAGIARISM: RESOURCES and TUTORIALS ON PLAGIARISM


 

 

 

 

 

WEB SEARCH STRATEGIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"WHAT ACADEMICS REALLY THINK ABOUT INFORMATION LITERACY", in the JOURNAL OF INFORMATION LITERACY Vol. 13, Issue 1 (JUNE 2019)

(Fantastic References at the end of the article)

 

 

 

LEARN TO CHOOSE, EVALUATE A TOPIC AND THEN CITE YOUR RESOURCES

A PRACTICAL EXERCISE FOR SILC PARTICPANTS, SUMMER of 2019:   

Using the UA Fayetteville Library's Databases, using the website libraries.uark.edu, find 5 articles on each of these topics and then cite each article using either the APA or the MLA Style Manual and indicate which database you used:

 

Social Media and Adolescent Health

 

Social Media and the Workplace

 

 

 

HOW TO WRITE (A WORDPRESS BLOG)

(An excellent handout for ESL classes, ESL Teachers, as well as for American Spaces, American Centers and American Corners overseas -- also a very useful handout for International students)

 

 

 

NEW!

RESEARCHING STUDENT's INFORMATION CHOICES: UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES IN COOPERATION WITH OCLC and RUTGERS SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION

 

 

 

NEW

STANFORD DIGITAL REPOSITORY:  

Evaluating Information: The Cornerstone of Civic Online Reasoning

 

 

 

 

NEW!

RESEARCH AND WRITING TUTORIALS FROM AN AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL IN THE E.U. (designed for advanced HS Students in the Writing Workshop) (includes Plagiarism resources)

 

 

 

 

NEW!

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS: HOW TO BEGIN YOUR RESEARCH:

Includes UNDERSTANDING LIBRARY ORGANIZATION

 

 

 

 

NEW!

RESEARCH TOPIC IDEAS (UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN) ; HOW TO COME UP WITH RESEARCH TOPICS -- for Papers, Speeches, Thesis Topics, etc.

(from the preface: "This is NOT a guide to help you research a topic. It is only intended to provide ideas for a paper. )

 

 

 

NEW!

USING LIBRARY RESOURCES -- includes Tutorials and how to evaluate resources for accuracy and timeliness

More information on how to evaluate resources (including web sites and web-based resources) for trustworthiness may be found here

 (this source includes a CRAAP evaluation worksheet endorsed by the American Library Association (ALA) CRAAP Evaluation Worksheet (PDF)  (http://bit.ly/CRAAPALA)

 

 

MORE INFORMATION ON THE CRAAP TEST may be found here 

CRAAP = CURRENCY, RELEVANCE, AUTHORITY, ACCURACY and PURPOSE

 

 

 


ARGUMENT AND CRITICAL THINKING (from the EXCELSIOR ONLINE WRITING LAB)

 

 

 

 

INFORMATION LITERACY TOOLBOX  (from Florida International University)

 

 

 

 

RESEARCH WRITING: AN ELEMENTARY INTRODUCTION (GOOGLE SLIDES -- AISC LIBRARY -- CYPRUS)

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1XuRVcCtyNN40WdbWHB4GPfhQFbseeo8GfxWv989D1AE/edit#slide=id.p1

(Courtesy of the AISC LIBRARY -- thank you!)

 

 

 

NEW!

LEARNING TO LEARN ONLINE: A GUIDE TO EFFECTIVE LEARNING STRATEGIES

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

Welcome to the Online Learning Journey

I. Who am I as an online learner? 

1. Identify skills for self-directed learning

2. Apply the plan-monitor-evaluate model for assessing your learning progress

3. Use critical questioning to support your learning

4. Manage information for online learning

II. Who am I on my learning journey with? 

5. Define your learning community

6. Understand the principles of effective teamwork

7. Plan for successful teamwork

8. Progress through the stages of team development

9. Make commitments that support teamwork

III. Who are my instructors? What is their role? 

10. Describe the role of an online instructor

11. Develop an effective student-instructor connection

IV. Time Management for Online Learning 

12. Use your course presentations to understand the shape of your semester

13. Create a semester schedule

14. Develop a weekly schedule that works

15. Manage daily tasks

16. Choose a daily task management system

17. Make use of small blocks of time

V. Professional Communication in the Online Environment 

18. Use email in the online learning environment

19. Communicate in online forums

20. Give and receive feedback

21. Learn with ePortfolios

VI. Analyzing Online Assignments 

22. Identify learning goals for assignments

23. Use a rubric to evaluate your work

24. Create an assignment plan

25. Use feedback to move forward

VII. Strategic Reading 

26. Assess the place of reading in your learning journey

27. Evaluate your reading skills

28. Review the SQ3R method for strategic reading

29. Identify the purpose of SQ3R steps

30. Apply the SQ3R method

31. Read journal articles strategically

32. Take effective notes on online readings

33. Review your learning

Congratulations

Downloadable Resources

References

 

 

NEW!

"Comparing the Information Needs and Experiences of Undergraduate Students and Practicing EngineersJOURNAL OF ACADEMIC LIBRARIANSHIP, Vol. 45, Issue 1, January 2019) pp. 39-49

 

 

 

 

Transition with Purpose: Pathways from English Language to Academic Study

https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/pdxopen/19/

"This Open Access Textbook will guide students through their English language to academic degree studies.

Part one of this textbook is a guide for moving from ESL study to academic study at Portland State University*.

It includes the resources students will use to understand policies and processes governing their degree study and their transition to academic coursework.

Part two focuses on how academic skills are used across various disciplines and is comprised of activities and assignments designed to practice these skills.

Key elements include culture and expectations in an American university, transferring academic skills from ESL to content-specific academic courses, and helpful exercises to be academically successful. *

While much of the content of this book relates specifically to Portland State University, it is our hope that the structure of the text and the activities within it may inspire adaptations to fit the needs of other colleges and universities."

 

 

 

 

"Is there an App for that? A review of Mobile Apps for Information Literacy classes."

An article in the November 2018 issue of College and Research Libraries News, Vol. 79, No. 10 by Abbie Basile and Sherry Mattis   https://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/article/view/17433/19241

 

 

 

Teaching Information Literacy to Undergraduate Philosophy Majors: A Research Study:  http://bit.ly/2S4JcqI

 

 

 

 The Dartmouth e-Guide to         Academic Success
DIGITAL LITERACY -- A KEY TO UNIVERSITY SUCCESS
sites.dartmouth.edu/learning/free-study-skills-e-book

Students and educators may find The Dartmouth E-Guide to Academic Success to be a helpful resource.

 

This e-guide is a free downloadable book published by Dartmouth College's Academic Skills Center in 2017. In eight chapters and fewer than one hundred pages (double-spaced), it offers readers a thorough, concise narrative reference for how to survive and thrive in college.

 

It begins by introducing readers to the idea of a growth mindset and explaining how to set effective goals for college, then walks readers through strategies for time management.

 

The e-guide also includes a variety of methods for important study skills such as taking useful notes, reading efficiently, and writing college essays.

 

Students (current and former) may also find the e-guide's tips on overcoming procrastination and enhancing productivity to be helpful.

 

Links to cited references (both peer-reviewed and popular) and additional information are included throughout the book, and it makes good use of explanatory graphics as well.

 

This e-guide was written by Carl Thum, Director of the Academic Skills Program, and Jonathan Lu, an undergraduate student at Dartmouth College.

 

 

 

Choosing & Using Sources: A Guide to Academic Research: a textbook from the U of Minnesota Press

Choosing & Using Sources presents a process for academic research and writing, from formulating your research question to selecting good information and using it effectively in your research assignments.

Additional chapters cover understanding types of sources, searching for information, and avoiding plagiarism.

Each chapter includes self-quizzes and activities to reinforce core concepts and help you apply them.

There are also appendices for quick reference on search tools, copyright basics, and fair use.

https://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/textbooks/333

Table of Contents:

Introduction

  • 1.Research Questions
  • 2.Types of Sources
  • 3.Sources and Information Needs
  • 4.Precision Searching
  • 5.Search Tools
  • 6.Evaluating Sources
  • 7.Ethical Use of Sources
  • 8.How to Cite Sources
  • 9.Making an Argument
  • 10.Writing Tips
  • 11.Copyright Basics
  • 12.Fair Use
  • 13.Roles of Research Sources

 

 

 

The Process of Research Writing: a textbook from the U of Minnesota Press

"The title of this book is The Process of Research Writing, and in the nutshell, that is what the book is about. A lot of times, instructors and students tend to separate “thinking,” “researching,” and “writing” into different categories that aren't necessarily very well connected. First you think, then you research, and then you write.
The reality is though that the possibilities and process of research writing are more complicated and much richer than that. We think about what it is we want to research and write about, but at the same time, we learn what to think based on our research and our writing. The goal of this book is to guide you through this process of research writing by emphasizing a series of exercises that touch on different and related parts of the research process."

https://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/textbooks/284

Table of Contents

Introduction
Part I: The Elements of Research

Chapter One Thinking Critically About Research
Chapter Two Understanding and Using the Library and the Internet for Research
Chapter Three Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Avoiding Plagiarism
Chapter Four How to Collaborate and Write With Others
Part II: Exercises in the Process of Research
Chapter Five The Working Thesis Exercise
Chapter Six The Annotated Bibliography Exercise
Chapter Seven The Critique Exercise
Chapter Eight The Antithesis Exercise
Chapter Nine The Categorization and Evaluation Exercise
Part III: The Research Project
Chapter Ten The Research Essay
Chapter Eleven Alternative Ways to Present Your Research
Chapter Twelve Citing Your Research Using MLA or APA Style

 

 

 

 

UNIVERSITY SUCCESS: HOW TO SURVIVE AND THRIVE IN YOUR FIRST YEAR - AND BEYOND, a free textbook

https://openpress.usask.ca/universitysuccess2ndedition/

Includes a chapter on the Writing Process:

  1. 8.1 Steps in the Research and Writing Process
  2. 8.2 Stage One: Prewriting Activities
  3. 8.3 Stage Two: Drafting Activities
  4. 8.4: Stage Three: Editing and Proofreading

and TAKING NOTES AND PREPARING FOR CLASS:

  1. 3.1 Setting Yourself Up for Success
  2. 3.2 Are You Ready for Class?
  3. 3.3 Are You Really Listening?
  4. 3.4 Got Notes?
  5. 3.5 Remembering Course Materials
  6. 3.6 Chapter Activities

 

 

 

 

Research Basics | About JSTOR

JSTOR’s Research Basics is a self-paced course that helps students learn academic research skills.

In order to most effectively use scholarly content in their research, students need to acquire the skills to navigate the resources. Built by librarians, this free course contains three modules of three lessons each that focus on library tools, smart searching, and managing information overload. Lessons are made up of video lectures followed by practice activities.    https://about.jstor.org/research-basics/

 

 

 

 

NEW! A FIVE STAR RESOURCE

A RESEARCH SKILLS HANDBOOK, the COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, GEORGIA STATE UNIVERSITY

 http://scholarworks.gsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1117&context=univ_lib_facpub 

College of Education Research Skills Handbook.pdf

 

 

 

NEW!

Information Literacy Research Skill Building: Academic Information Basics -- from Washington State University Libraries

This guide contains information literacy instructional materials based on the ACRL Information Literacy Standards. It includes academic information basics, links to specific aspects of information literacy, and subject-specific academic information.

http://libguides.libraries.wsu.edu/c.php?g=294153&p=1959590

IDescribes how to evaluate websites and Information, information about Plagiarism, how to choose and then refine a topic, and so much more. A truly excellent guide from the Libraries at Washington State University; the guide is unique for integrating Podcasts or Videos to better explain topics and concepts.

 

 

NEW!

Thinking Well: FREE TEXTBOOK; FREE DOWNLOAD

An Open Source Logic and Critical Thinking Textbook

http://www.alav.in/teaching-resources/

 

 

 

 

NEW 

FREE TEXTBOOK ON INFORMATION LITERACY:

https://courses.candelalearning.com/informationliteracyxmaster/

Includes Tutorials on Word, PowerPoint, Excel, Computer Concepts, Research Techniques, Assessing Facts vs. fallacies, etc.

Here is an example from Chapters 3/4 of this textbook: other chapters cover additional themes

 

 

 

Involved: Writing for College, Writing for Your Self

Involved: Writing for College, Writing for Your Self helps students to understand their college experience as a way of advancing their own personal concerns and to draw substance from their reading and writing assignments.

By enabling students to understand what it is they are being asked to write—from basic to complex communications—and how they can go about fulfilling those tasks meaningfully and successfully, this book helps students to develop themselves in all the ways the university offers. This edition of the book has been adapted from the print edition, published in 1997 by Houghton Mifflin.

Copyrighted materials—primarily images and examples within the text—have been removed from this edition.

(Colorado State University)   by Charles Bazerman  

https://wac.colostate.edu/books/practice/involved/

Table of Contents for this Book:

Open the entire book: 42 Mb (FREE!)

Preface and Acknowledgments

Part One. Writing Your Self into College

Chapter 1: Strategic Writing

Chapter 2: The Classroom Situation

Chapter 3: Writing Processes

 

Part Two. Thriving in the Classroom

Chapter 4: Journals and Reflective Writing

Chapter 5: Notes and Summaries: Writing to Remember

Chapter 6: Exam Writing: Displaying Knowledge

 

Part Three. Using Concepts to View the World

Chapter 7: Illustrative Writing: Connecting Concepts and Real Examples

Chapter 8: Autobiographical Writing: Connecting Concepts and Experience

Chapter 9: Analytical Writing: Looking Closely

 

Part Four. Investigating

Chapter 10: The Investigative Process

Chapter 11: Investigating the Archive: Library Research Writing

Chapter 12: New Investigations: Fieldwork and Laboratories

 

Part Five. Dealing with Complexity

Chapter 13: Writing About Complex Worlds

Chapter 14: Writing About Problem Cases

Chapter 15: Arguing Your Case

Subject Index

Readings Index

 

 

 

BEGIN YOUR RESEARCH: A GUIDE FROM GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY, USA

http://infoguides.gmu.edu/basics

 

 

 

A CRUCIAL LINK TO ALL THE FREELY AVAILABLE SUBJECT GUIDES PUBLISHED BY LIBRARIANS AT THE GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES, USA

http://infoguides.gmu.edu/?b=s

 

 

 

 

NAVIGATING THE LIBRARY AS AN INTERNATIONAL STUDENT:

http://infoguides.gmu.edu/intlstudents

added July 14, 2018 (from GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY, USA)

Includes the following:

Welcome to the Navigating the Library as an International Student InfoGuide. 

Use this guide to discover resources available to you at Mason.

 

 

 

 

NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY: NEW, FREE OPEN ACCESS RESOURCES FOR STUDENTS, TEACHERS, RESEARCHERS

 

NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY FREE e-RESOURCES:

also see: https://www.nypl.org/research/collections/digital-collections/public-domain

 

 

NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY AMAZING DIGITIZED RESOURCES:

https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/

 

 

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS:

Please Note: The Library of Congress also has significant Digital Collections, free to the public, free to students, free to researchers.

 

 

 

 

 10 Ways to spot a Fake News Article:  https://goo.gl/gmHi2w

 

 

 

 

 

Demystifying the Research Process: a Library Guide from North Central University

http://ncu.libguides.com/c.php?g=635502

 

 

 

 

A New Library Guide from the New York City School Library System:

"Information Literacy: Website Evaluation"

http://nycdoe.libguides.com/InformationLiteracy/websiteevaluation

Includes:

 

 

 

 

 

NEW!

DEVELOPING RESEARCH SKILLS: A NARRATED SLIDE PRESENTATION FROM NIAGARA COLLEGE:

https://www.niagaracollege.ca/modules/WIL2018/6.1/story_html5.html?lms=1

 

 

 

 

FREE TEXTBOOK:

COLLEGE READING AND WRITING: UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA PRESS

https://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/textbooks/the-word-on-college-reading-and-writing

"Written by five college reading and writing instructors, this interactive, multimedia text draws from decades of experience teaching students who are entering the college reading and writing environment for the very first time.

It includes examples, exercises, and definitions for just about every reading- and writing-related topic students will encounter in their college courses."

Table of Contents

Introduction
Part 1: Working with Texts

  • What is a Text?

Building Strong Reading Skills

  • Read Effectively
  • Create an Optimal Setting for Reading
  • Use Pre-reading Strategies
  • Read Efficiently
  • Annotate and Take Notes
  • Do Quick Research
  • Discover What a Text is Trying to Say
  • Explore the Ways the Text Affects You
  • Reflect
  • Troubleshoot Your Reading

Writing about Texts

  • Reading Critically
  • Exploring the Structure of a Text
  • Dialectic Note-taking
  • Analyzing Content and Rhetoric
  • Sentence-Level Analysis
  • Point of View
  • Word Choice
  • Paragraph Analysis
  • Summarizing a Text
  • Critiquing a Text
  • Drawing Conclusions, Synthesizing, and Reflecting

What is Information Literacy?

  • Why is Information Literacy Important?
  • Finding Quality Texts
  • Learning About Plagiarism and Guidelines for Using Information

Part 2: Writing

  • About This Section

Why Write?

  • Self-Exploration and Self-Enrichment
  • Creativity
  • Comprehension and Academic Performance
  • Professional Opportunities
  • Effective Communication and Persuasion

Determining Your Audience and Purpose

  • Audience
  • Purpose
  • Appealing to Your Audience
  • Exercises
  • Tone, Voice, and Point of View

Prewriting—Generating Ideas

  • Selecting and Narrowing a Topic
  • Strategies for Getting Started
  • Imagining Your Audience’s Needs

Drafting

  • Organizing Your Ideas and Looking for Connections
  • Finding the Thesis
  • Writing a First Draft
  • Writing Paragraphs
  • The Paragraph Body: Supporting Your Ideas
  • Developing Relationships between Ideas
  • Patterns of Organization and Methods of Development
  • Writing Introductions
  • Writing Conclusions
  • Writing Summaries
  • Paraphrasing
  • Quoting

Using Sources Correctly

  • Crediting and Citing Your Sources
  • Citing: Identifying In-Text Sources
  • Citing or Identifying Images in Your Writing
  • Handling Titles
  • Proofreading Your Work with Sources
  • Using Citation Generators

Dealing with Obstacles and Developing Good Habits

  • Overcoming Writing Anxiety and Writer's Block
  • Good Writing Habits
  • Procrastination

Revising

  • Higher vs. Lower Order Concerns
  • Reverse Outlining
  • Editing
  • Document Format, Documentation Style, and Proofreading
  • Giving and Receiving Feedback
  • What's Next?

Appendices
Grammar and Style

Resources for Working with MLA
Creating a Works Cited Page
Results for the "Check Your Understanding" Activities
Glossary of Terms
Works Cited in This Text

 

 

 

FREE TEXTBOOK from the UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA PRESS

THE SIMPLE MATH OF WRITING WELL: WRITING FOR THE 21st CENTURY

"Writing guides abound, but The Simple Math of Writing Well is one of a kind. Readers will find its practical approach affirming, encouraging, and informative, and its focus on the basics of linguistic structure releases 21st-century writers to embrace the variety of mediums that define our internet-connected world. As Harrop reminds us in the opening chapters of her book, we write more today than ever before in history: texts, emails, letters, blogs, reports, social media posts, proposals, etc. The Simple Math of Writing Well is the first guide that directly addresses the importance of writing well in the Google age."

Table of Contents

About the Book
Reviewers' Notes
Andragogy & Rule Changes
Preface: Writing as Simple Math 1 + 1 = 2
Introduction: Myths and Rule Changes 1

PART I. THE SENTENCE EQUATION

  • 1. Main Verbs
  • 2. Main Subjects
  • 3. Terminal Punctuation Marks
  • 4. Mid-Sentence Punctuation Marks
  • 5. Eight Parts of Speech
  • 6. Consistency

PART II. THE PARAGRAPH EQUATION

  • 7. Topic Sentences
  • 8. Evidence
  • 9. Summary Sentences

PART III. THE ESSAY EQUATION

  • 10. Thesis Statements
  • 11. Introductions
  • 12. Body Paragraphs
  • 13. Conclusions

PART IV. THE PROCESS OF WRITING WELL

  • 14. Purpose
  • 15. Audience
  • 16. Voice
  • 17. Context
  • 18. Claims and Appeals
  • 19. Clarity and Cohesion
  • 20. Revision and Creativity

PART V. RESEARCH

  • 21. Finding Credible Evidence
  • 22. Including Outside Evidence

PART VI. ACADEMIC FORMATTING

  • 23. APA
  • 24. MLA
  • 25. Turabian

PART VII. BEYOND ACADEMIA

  • 26. Emails
  • 27. Letters
  • 28. Reports and Proposals

Conclusion

 

 

 

THE PROCESS OF RESEARCH WRITING: A FREE TEXTBOOK FOR STUDENTS AND TEACHERS:

http://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/BookDetail.aspx?bookId=284

Table of Contents 

Introduction
Part I:  The Elements of Research

Chapter One Thinking Critically About Research
Chapter Two Understanding and Using the Library and the Internet for Research
Chapter Three Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Avoiding Plagiarism
Chapter Four How to Collaborate and Write With Others
Part II:  Exercises in the Process of Research
Chapter Five The Working Thesis Exercise
Chapter Six The Annotated Bibliography Exercise
Chapter Seven The Critique Exercise
Chapter Eight The Antithesis Exercise
Chapter Nine The Categorization and Evaluation Exercise
Part III:  The Research Project
Chapter Ten The Research Essay
Chapter Eleven Alternative Ways to Present Your Research
Chapter Twelve Citing Your Research Using MLA or APA Style

 

 

 

 

FINDING FREE OPEN ACCESS (OER) MATERIALS, DATABASES AND FREE TEXTBOOKS: a Research Library in the Netherlands offers tips and tricks

https://www.wur.nl/en/Expertise-Services/Facilities/Library/Teachers/OER/Finding-open-content.htm

 

 

 

 

TEXTBOOK: CHOOSING AND USING SOURCES: A GUIDE TO ACADEMIC RESEARCH:

http://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/BookDetail.aspx?bookId=333

Table of Contents

Introduction

  • 1. Research Questions
  • 2. Types of Sources
  • 3. Sources and Information Needs
  • 4. Precision Searching
  • 5. Search Tools
  • 6. Evaluating Sources
  • 7. Ethical Use of Sources
  • 8. How to Cite Sources
  • 9. Making an Argument
  • 10. Writing Tips
  • 11. Copyright Basics
  • 12. Fair Use
  • 13. Roles of Research Sources

 

 

 

TEXTBOOK: INFORMATION LITERACY: RESEARCH AND COLLABORATION ACROSS DISCIPLINES:

http://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/BookDetail.aspx?bookId=391

Chapter 17, for example is a winner:

Chapter 17. Supporting Academics to Embed Information Literacy to Enhance Students' Research and Writing Process, 

Table of Contents

  • Front Matter
  • Introduction, Barbara J. D'Angelo, Sandra Jamieson, Barry Maid, and Janice R. Walker

Part I. Situating Information Literacy

  • Chapter 1. Writing Information Literacy: A Retrospective and a Look Ahead, Rolf Norgaard and Caroline Sinkinson
  • Chapter 2. Threshold Concepts: Integrating and Applying Information Literacy and Writing Instruction, Barry Maid and Barbara D'Angelo
  • Chapter 3. Employer Expectations of Information Literacy: Identifying the Skills Gap, Dale Cyphert and Stanley P. Lyle
  • Chapter 4. Creating and Exploring New Worlds: Web 2.0, Information Literacy, and the Ways We Know, Kathleen Blake Yancey
  • Chapter 5. Information Literacy in Digital Environments: Construct Mediation, Construct Modeling, and Validation Processes, Irvin R. Katz and Norbert Elliot

Part II. Researching Information Literacy

  • Chapter 6. What the Citation Project Tells Us about Information Literacy in College Composition, Sandra Jamieson
  • Chapter 7. Preliminary Paths to Information Literacy: Introducing Research in Core Courses, Katt Blackwell-Starnes
  • Chapter 8. Approximating the University: The Information Literacy Practices of Novice Researchers, Karen Gocsik, Laura R. Braunstein, and Cynthia E. Tobery
  • Chapter 9. Understanding and Using Sources: Student Practices and Perceptions, Patti Wojahn, Theresa Westbrock, Rachel Milloy, Seth Myers, Matthew Moberly, and Lisa Ramirez
  • Chapter 10. Writing Information Literacy in First-Year Composition: A Collaboration among Faculty and Librarians, Donna Scheidt, William Carpenter, Robert Fitzgerald, Cara Kozma, Holly Middleton, and Kathy Shields

Part III. Incorporating and Evaluating Information Literacy in Specific Courses

  • Chapter 11. Up the Mountain without a Trail: Helping Students Use Source Networks to Find Their Way, Miriam Laskin and Cynthia R. Haller
  • Chapter 12. Ethics, Distribution, and Credibility: Using an Emerging Genre to Teach Information Literacy Concepts, Christopher Toth and Hazel McClure
  • Chapter 13. Information Literacy Preparation of Pre-Service and Graduate Educators, Susan Brown and Janice R. Walker
  • Chapter 14. Not Just for Citations: Assessing Zotero While Reassessing Research, Rachel Rains Winslow, Sarah L. Skripsky, and Savannah L. Kelly
  • Chapter 15. Quantitative Reasoning and Information Literacy in Economics, Diego Méndez-Carbajo

Part IV. Collaborating to Advance Programmatic Information Literacy

  • Chapter 16. Moving Ahead by Looking Back: Crafting a Framework for Sustainable, Institutional Information Literacy, Lori Baker and Pam Gladis
  • Chapter 17. Supporting Academics to Embed Information Literacy to Enhance Students' Research and Writing Process, Angela Feekery, Lisa Emerson, and Gillian Skyrme
  • Chapter 18. Building Critical Researchers and Writers Incrementally: Vital Partnerships Between Faculty and Librarians, Alison S. Gregory and Betty L. McCall
  • Chapter 19. Impacting Information Literacy through Alignment, Resources, and Assessment, Beth Bensen, Denise Woetzel, Hong Wu, and Ghazala Hashmi
  • Chapter 20. Bridging the Gaps: Collaboration in a Faculty and Librarian Community of Practice on Information Literacy, Francia Kissel, Melvin R. Wininger, Scott R. Weeden, Patricia A. Wittberg, Randall S. Halverson, Meagan Lacy, and Rhonda K. Huisman

 

 

 

NEW TEXTBOOK ON INFORMATION LITERACY:

(University of Minnesota Open Online Textbook series)

http://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/BookDetail.aspx?bookId=190 

Table of Contents 

Chapter 1 Identify: Understanding Your Information Need

Chapter 2 Scope: Knowing What Is Available

Chapter 3 Plan: Developing Research Strategies

Chapter 4 Gather: Finding What You Need

Chapter 5 Evaluate: Assessing Your Research Process and Findings

Chapter 6 Manage: Organizing Information Effectively and Ethically

Chapter 7 Present: Sharing What You’ve Learned

Chapter 8 Visual Literacy: Applying Information Literacy to Visual Materials

Chapter 9 Science Literacy: Information Literacy in the Sciences

 

 

 

 

HOW DO I TEACH STUDENTS HOW TO WRITE A RESEARCHABLE INQUIRY QUESTION?

 

 

 

 

 

JSTOR Open Content provides free access to more than 10 million academic Open Access journal articles and book chapters in 75 disciplines, including 2500+ open access eBooks.

JSTOR's Open Access eBooks are freely available to use at no cost to libraries or users worldwide.

JSTOR Lab's Multilingual Test Analyzer Tool allows documents to be analyzed and translated into several languages.

 

 

 

 


RESEARCH TOOL EXAMPLE: FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY, FIU: A RESEARCH TOOLBOX:

 Includes the Research Journey, and finding materials by subject area.  

 http://libguides.fiu.edu/c.php?g=349037&p=2370111

THIS FIU LIBGUIDE includes the following:

 

 

 

 

ACADEMIC WRITING: A RESEARCH TUTORIAL FROM THE COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY (CSU) LIBRARIES:   https://libguides.colostate.edu/co130

  

 

 

More Library Information Literacy Tutorials:

http://libguides.library.cofc.edu/tutorialcreation/bestpractices

 

and:

 

https://library.uncw.edu/tutorials

 

 

INFORMATION LITERACY TUTORIALS:

http://libraryguides.lib.iup.edu/c.php?g=60442&p=389099

 

 

How to Research from Pima County Community College:

https://pima.edu/academics-programs/academic-support/library/how-to-research.html

 

 

 

THE MIT LIBRARIES RESEARCH GUIDES, EXPLANING THE RESEARCH PROCESS: 

 https://libraries.mit.edu/research-support/

 

 

 

 

HERE IS ONE EXCELLENT EXAMPLE OF THE POWER OF LIBGUIDES:

NEW! OPEN EDUCATION RESOURCES: A NEW LIBGUIDE, INCLUDES A COLLECTION OF OPEN EDUCATIONAL TEXTBOOKS: http://libguides.lcc.edu/oer

 

 

 

OPEN EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES, INCLUDING OPEN TEXTBOOKS:

http://libguides.framingham.edu/content.php?pid=158482

 

AND:

 

http://research.gfcmsu.edu/content.php?pid=603525

 

 

AND:

 

Open Educational Resources (OER) from U MASS DARTMOUTH:

http://guides.lib.umassd.edu/c.php?g=254707&p=1698634

An explanation and listing of new resources and databases -- free and downloadable. Great to explore in your American Space --

 

 

 

LESSON PLANS FOR WEB LITERACY IN THE 21st CENTURY:

https://learning.mozilla.org/en-US/web-literacy

INCLUDES:

 

21st Century Skills:

  • Problem-Solving
  • Communication
  • Creativity
  • Collaboration

 

 

 

WEB LITERACY FOR STUDENT FACT CHECKERS:

This is a practical guide for the student fact-checker.  It supplements generic information literacy with the specific web-based techniques that can get students closer to the truth on the web more quickly.   https://webliteracy.pressbooks.com

 

 
 
LIB 180 – Research for the 21st Century

This course develops a framework for research in the online environment and helps students build skills and techniques for success as online learners. Through quarter-long research projects on global issues, students examine various strategies for locating, evaluating, and applying information resources in the research process with attention to information issues …

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harvard College Writing Center: Strategies for Essay Writing

http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/strategies-essay-writing

"Strategies for essay writing. The links below provide concise advice on some fundamental elements of academic writing."

 

 

 

 

INFORMATION LITERACY WEBSITES FROM THE ALA-- AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION

http://libguides.ala.org/InformationEvaluation/Infolit

Note the following useful resources for IRCs and American Spaces:

High School Students and Their Use of the World Wide Web for Research, by Michael Lorenzen 

Part of a larger website on library instruction.

Internet Public Library for Teens "A+ Research and Writing"

"Research High," by Debra Whelan -- Most kids used to think research was spelled G-o-o-g-l-e

Resources for School Librarians Information Skills Instruction

 

 

 

FOR LIBRARIANS, PROFESSORS, OR FOR THOSE OFFERING RESEARCH CLASSES.

A NEW FREE TEXTBOOK ON "CHOOSING AND USING RESOURCES:  A GUIDE TO ACADEMIC RESEARCH"     

"Choosing & Using Sources presents a process for academic research and writing, from formulating your research question to selecting good information and using it effectively in your research assignments. Additional chapters cover understanding types of sources, searching for information, and avoiding plagiarism. Each chapter includes self-quizzes and activities to reinforce core concepts and help you apply them. There are also appendices for quick reference on search tools, copyright basics, and fair use."  https://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/BookDetail.aspx?bookId=333

 

The PDF version of this freely downloadable textbook is available here: 

http://guides.osu.edu/ld.php?content_id=24379319

 

 

 

SCIENCE INFORMATION LITERACY: (from ALA's ACRL Division)

http://wikis.ala.org/acrl/index.php/Science_Information_Literacy

(with examples of Lesson Plans in different Science disciplines --

 

 

 

 

ACRL WEBLIOGRAPHIES, TUTORIALS AND CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES ON INFORMATION LITERACY:

https://www.zotero.org/groups/acrl_instruction_section_teaching_methods_committee_bibliographies/items/order/dateModified/sort/asc/tag/Texts

 

 

 

 

APA FORMAT: Everything you always wanted to know about the APA Format from Harvard University Writing Classes, but were afraid to ask:  

http://gseacademic.harvard.edu/~instruct/articulate/apa_mod/APA_Intro/player.html

 

 

 

 

A TUTORIAL ON RESEARCH TECHNIQUES FROM THE U. of WASHINGTON LIBRARIES:

http://guides.lib.uw.edu/c.php?g=342113&p=2302727

 

 

 

Research Roadmap: Tutorials and Videos on Research

from Humboldt State University:  

"Research Roadmap is an interactive online tutorial for students wanting an introduction to research skills. The tutorial covers the basics, including how to select a topic and develop research questions, select, search for, find, and evaluate information sources. It also covers the ethics of information use, including copyright and fair use, how to avoid plagiarism, and how to cite sources correctly."   

http://libguides.humboldt.edu/tutorials

 

   

 

This LibGuide provides strategies and resources on  locating, finding, evaluating, citing images.  This guide also addresses digital imaging:

this particular Libguide is from SUNY BINGHAMTON UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES: 

http://libraryguides.binghamton.edu/using_images 

 

 

 

RESEARCH TOPIC IDEAS -- as COMPILED BY PROFESSIONAL LIBRARIANS   

http://libguides.umflint.edu/c.php?g=61034

 

 

 

 

HOW TO DO BIOGRAPHICAL RESEARCH IN BIOGRAPHICAL DATABASES:

http://www.nypl.org/blog/2016/06/09/biography-databases-research

(NYPL = NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY)

 

 

SEE ALSO THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY'S TUTORIAL ON ONLINE RESEARCH: WHERE TO START  

 http://www.nypl.org/blog/2015/08/21/start-online-research

 

 


FREE OPEN ACCESS DATABASES 

 

 

 

Recognizing and Avoiding Plagiarism: An Interactive Quiz: 

testing one's knowledge about proper citing and paraphrasing.

https://plagiarism.arts.cornell.edu/tutorial/exercises.cfm 

by Librarians at Cornell University, U.S.A. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to Determine if an Article is Scholarly

Provides a brief, three question quiz that helps you determine if an article is scholarly.  Links to PowerPoint presentations that provide detail on how to evaluate articles to determine if they are scholarly or not. (U Michigan)  

https://umich.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_4GzxIyQygbfNBU9&Q_JFE=0 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Information Literacy User’s Guide: An Open, Online Textbook: 

http://textbooks.opensuny.org/the-information-literacy-users-guide-an-open-online-textbook/

"Good researchers have a host of tools at their disposal that make navigating today’s complex information ecosystem much more manageable. Gaining the knowledge, abilities, and self-reflection necessary to be a good researcher helps not only in academic settings, but is invaluable in any career, and throughout one’s life. The Information Literacy User’s Guide will start you on this route to success.

The Information Literacy User’s Guide introduces students to critical concepts of information literacy as defined for the information-infused and technology-rich environment in which they find themselves. This book helps students examine their roles as information creators and sharers and enables them to more effectively deploy related skills. This textbook includes relatable case studies and scenarios, many hands-on exercises, and interactive quizzes

 

MORE OPEN SUNY TEXTBOOKS HERE (BY SUBJECT)

https://textbooks.opensuny.org/browse-by-subject/

 

 

 

Research 101: 

http://libguides.csn.edu/research-101/ (from the College of Southern Nevada)  

 This tutorial is designed to guide learners through the research process: choosing a topic, using the best sources, finding and evaluating sources, and citing them. A graded quiz completes the tutorial. Includes the following concepts: how to use libraries, how to write citations, strengthening research skills, learning assessment, information literacy skills.

 

 

 

HOW TO READ AN ACADEMIC ARTICLE   

http://faculty.washington.edu/davidgs/ReadArticle.html

This brief article provides several tips to students who are new to reading, analyzing, and evaluating scholarly articles that they encounter in their course readings.  This is an excellent supplemental assigned reading.

 


 

 

PLAGIARISM WORKBOOK: a Workbook for Teachers and Students:

http://www.plagiarismchecker.net/Plagiarism-workbook.pdf?pdf=Plagiarism-workbook

 

 

 

 

DEALING WITH PLAGIARISM: A VIDEO TUTORIAL: 

http://people.emich.edu/ztomas/DepartingPlagiarismWorkshop/

A video-based workshop prepared for university/college writing instructors whose classes include second language (L2) writers. 

The main objectives of the workshop and provided materials are to:

  1. help teachers understand the complexity surrounding source use, especially in the case of second language writers;

  2. problematize the punitive approach to dealing with ineffective textual borrowing;

  3. discuss the spectrum of textual borrowing strategies in student writing, ranging from direct, unattributed copying to effective textual borrowing;

  4. provide teachers with effective and  non-punitive ways of responding to problematic textual borrowing.

 

 

 

RESEARCH SKILLS HANDBOOK, COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, GEORGIA STATE UNIVERSITY

 

 

 

 

WEB SEARCH STRATEGIES IN PLAIN ENGLISH:

(A VIDEO from COMMONCRAFT)

http://www.commoncraft.com/video/web-search-strategies

 

 

 

 

 HOW TO TELL WHAT's REAL AND WHAT's NOT IN INTERNET SEARCHES: EVALUATING THE WEB (FROM ITHACA COLLEGE):  

https://www.projectlooksharp.org/?action=webresources_websites

 

 

 

 

STUDIES ON WIKIPEDIA:

A Librarian's Perspective on Wikipedia:

Wikipedia One Librarians Perspective.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

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